Puget Sound, Washington

Quick Facts and Pricing

Reservation Request

Season
All Year
Tide Chart
Wind Direction
Food Forms
Length
Full day 8-9 hours fishing time
Half day 4-5 hours fishing time
From Seattle
30 – 90 minutes
Pricing
$450 Full day walk and wade, 1-2 anglers
$350 Half day walk and wade, 1-2 anglers
$75 additional for 3rd angler
Prices do not include WA state sales tax
Species
Native Coastal Cutthroat
Resident/Migratory Coho/Silver Salmon
Pink/Humpy Salmon
Blackmouth/Chinook Salmon
Chum/Dog Salmon

Details

Rods
Moderate to fast action 5 – 6wt rods with floating lines
Winston/Sage/Echo demo rods provided at no charge
Flies
West’s Smelt, West’s Herring, Southworth Special, Herring Popper, Reverse Spiders, Morrish’s Small Fry, Rolled Muddler, Silly Leg Spider and Euphasid patterns, Saltwater deer hair dry flies, Chernobyl ants/hoppers, Miyawaki’s Popper, Bonefish Puffs, Crazy Charlies, Clousers, Bend Backs, Deceivers, Foul Free Herring, Shock and Awe
Sizes
Hook sizes for cutthroat should be size 8 or smaller to avoid fatally hooking smaller sized fish.
Food
Menu options for full day trips — Lunch
Clothing and Equipment Checklist
Summer and/or Winter
Cancellation Policy
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Many but not all visitors to the Seattle and Tacoma areas believe Puget Sound to be the open ocean when in fact it is a huge maze of bays and inlets reaching from Bellingham to Olympia. While the Sound is affected by tides and is saltwater, it remains a very different watershed from the coastal ocean. One of the primary differences is the protection from the Olympic Peninsula which forms a barrier between the coastal ocean and the Sound.

This barrier offers fly anglers a rich haven for casting flies to sea run cutthroat trout and all species of salmon without the crashing surf found on the coast.The state of Washington has nearly 3,000 miles of saltwater shorelines, much of which are within close proximity to the Seattle area. Rivers and creeks flow into the Sound from the mainland and from most of the islands and peninsulas located nearby. These freshwater resources are spawning grounds for a large population of cutthroat trout that move into the saltwater during the spring and stay into the fall, creating a tremendous fishery with very little pressure.

Within an hour of Seattle or less, you can be fly-fishing to sea-run cutthroats that have been super-charged by their stay in the saltwater. Most of this takes place on various beaches and points located up and down Puget Sound. As the tide is coming in or going out, many of the trout, and often times Coho salmon and other species, use structure near these beaches like rocks in a river.

The structure can come in many forms, with rocks, points, logs, and kelp beds being the most common. While the structure gives them a place to rest against the tidal current, they chase baitfish close to shore creating a feeding frenzy right in front of you.Much of the time, you will be casting baitfish patterns to rising trout just ahead of you, more often however, you will cast over structure where the trout are likely to be holding. As you cast to these native trout, you twitch and strip your fly awaiting their aggressive strike. These native trout average about 10-12 inches, with some slightly smaller and many others much larger. With a little persistence, one can hook into a 20-inch or larger trout.


Dave,

And thank you for your informative, educational, entertaining and pleasurable day.  I am pretty impressed.  I can easily say that was the finest day I have ever had on the salt. Wow! Thank you for the incredible photos – definitely represents how the day was – top quality.

Look forward to the pics as well as many years of enjoying the cutts now.

Oly Welke
Seattle, WA


For the months of August through October however, the most popular fish to chase is the Coho or “silver” salmon. These fish, while still in the saltwater, ranging from 18 inches to 15 pounds, at times feel unlandable. Absolutely one of the best game fish in the world!

Many locals are firm believers that this is a 7-8 month a year fishery, with most of the cutthroat heading into spawing waters for the winter. This is simply not the case. As you fish the winter months of November through February, you will find fish that have obviously not been in fresh water for a long time. Covered in sea lice, girthy and strong, these fish are just waiting for anything resembling food to come by. The winter months can actually be some of the most productive SRC fishing available and even fewer anglers are tackling the beaches this time of year.

This is a walk and wade trip limited to two persons per guide. Because of the proximity of many of these estuaries, this makes a great half-day trip for the business traveler who is on a more stringent time schedule but wants to get away from the hotel and see some of the beautiful surroundings Seattle has to offer.

We also work very closely with Capt. Keith Robbins of Spot Tail Salmon Guide to offer chartered fly fishing trips in the Sound as well.


Ted,

Thanks for a great day on the Sound.  The cutts were great, along with the eagles, sea lions, starfish, dungees, and  the rest of the wildlife.  Your patience in my getting the casting down was also greatly appreciated.  I look forward to coming back out there at some point in the future and doing some more fly fishing with you guys.

Please shoot me an email with the pictures…a lot of folks are anxious to see them.

Darren Raiguel
Bay Area, CA